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Complete listing of illustrations in the exhibit.
Use this index to locate specific items of interest, or use the "Next"
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THE HISTORY OF THE CABINS
NINETEENTH-CENTURY LIFE IN THESE CABINS
TWENTIETH-CENTURY LIFE IN THESE HOUSES
SEARCHING FOR AFRICAN ANCESTORS
BUILDING THE HEWN-TIMBER CABINS
RUSKA GREGG—WOODCRAFTSMAN
RECALLING OTHER CRAFTSMEN
WORKING IN THE FIELDS
COTTON-PICKING TIME
THE RICE GROWERS
ACKNOWLEDGING AFRICAN CULTURE AND CONTRIBUTIONS
NEARBY AFRICAN-AMERICAN SITES
ARTIFACTS


THE HISTORY OF THE CABINS.
    Fig. 1.       Map: Present location of hewn-timber cabins.
    Fig. 2.       Ms. Catherine’s house.
    Fig. 3.       Ms. Tena’s house.
    Fig. 4.       Sign at the cabins.
    Fig. 5.       Map: Mars Bluff
    Fig. 6.       Plat: Original location of cabins
    Fig. 7.       Dovetailing.
    Fig. 8.       Treasures of Ancient Nigeria.
    Fig. 9.       Cabin with addition at the back.
    Fig. 10.     Alex Gregg.
    Fig. 11.     Ms. Catherine’s house with addition.
    Fig. 12.     Ms. Tena’s house with addition.
    Fig. 13.     The Waiterses bought a home.
    Fig. 14.     Their old houses stood empty.
    Fig. 15.     Ms. Catherine’s house after Hurricane Hugo.
NINETEENTH-CENTURY LIFE IN THESE CABINS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 16.     Alex Gregg & Florence Henderson Gregg.
    Fig. 17.     Archie Waiters with grandparents’ picture.
    Fig. 18.     Gourd dippers.
    Fig. 19.     Well bucket.
    Fig. 20.     Early mattresses.
    Fig. 21.     Food trays.
    Fig. 22.     Wooden food container.
    Fig. 23.     Bell.
TWENTIETH-CENTURY LIFE IN THESE HOUSES (Return to the top).
    Fig. 24.     The Waiterses’ first home.
    Fig. 25.     Fireplace, pot, iron, and broom.
    Fig. 26.     Pot for cooking in the fireplace.
    Fig. 27.     Kettle.
    Fig. 28.     Table, chairs, and crate.
    Fig. 29.     Straight chair with cane bottom..
    Fig. 30.     Crate.
    Fig. 31.     Lamp.
    Fig. 32.     Lamp, a second one.
    Fig. 33.     Table with canned food and gourd.
    Fig. 34.     Jars for canning.
    Fig. 35.     Hog scraper.
    Fig. 36.     Lantern.
    Fig. 37.     Pump.
    Fig. 38.     Ms. Waiters and three of her sons.
    Fig. 39.     Large gourd dipper
    Fig. 40.     Uncut gourd.
    Fig. 41.     Behind Ms. Catherine’s house.
    Fig. 42.     Diagram of Ms. Catherine’s house.
    Fig. 43.     Bed and quilt.
    Fig. 44.     African influence in quilts.
    Fig. 45.     Iron bed.
    Fig. 46.     Ms. Catherine’s quilt.
    Fig. 47.     Ms. Catherine’s wash pot.
    Fig. 48.     Soap made by Ms. Catherine.
    Fig. 49.     Ironing board.
    Fig. 50.     Ms. Catherine’s iron.
    Fig. 51.     Iron with handle made by blacksmith.
    Fig. 52.     Cleaning her iron.
    Fig. 53.     Wallpaper in Ms. Catherine’s house.
    Fig. 54.     Poster showing Ms. Catherine’s wallpaper.
    Fig. 55.     Yard broom.
    Fig. 56.     Sweeping in a neighbor’s yard.
    Fig. 57.     A second yard broom.
    Fig. 58.     Medicinal plants.
    Fig. 59.     Bottle and snuff can.
    Fig. 60.     Horseshoe.
    Fig. 61.     Sewing machine.
    Fig. 62.     Ed Pinkney.
    Fig. 63.     Wooden trunk.
    Fig. 64.     Table with tin top.
    Fig. 65.     Gourd with leather thong.
    Fig. 66.     Blue straight chair.
    Fig. 67.     Armchair.
    Fig. 68.     Small rocking chair.
    Fig. 69.     Porch rocking chair.
    Fig. 70.     Lodge badge.
    Fig. 71.     Janie Pinkney.
    Fig. 72.     Old house broom.
    Fig. 73.     Broomstraw.
    Fig. 74.     House broom with special loop.
    Fig. 75.     New house broom.
    Fig. 76.     A new home.
    Fig. 77.     Where the old meets the new.
SEARCHING FOR AFRICAN ANCESTORS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 78.     Who were their ancestors?.
    Fig. 79.     The search.
    Fig. 80.     Mariah Malinka.
    Fig. 81.     West Africa and the Congo.
    Fig. 82.     Words from the Bantu.
    Fig. 83.     Words from West Africa.
    Fig. 84.     Great Da.
BUILDING THE HEWN-TIMBER CABINS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 85.     Who built the cabins?.
    Fig. 86.     Full-dovetailed cornering.
    Fig. 87.     Timbers smooth and tight fitting.
    Fig. 88.     Saw.
    Fig. 89.     Wedge.
    Fig. 90.     Glut.
    Fig. 91.     Hewing.
    Fig. 92.     Felling axe.
    Fig. 93.     Scoring a log with an axe.
    Fig. 94.     Broadaxe blade.
    Fig. 95.     Hewing with a broadaxe.
    Fig. 96.     Adz blade.
    Fig. 97.     Drawing of hewing with an adz.
    Fig. 98.     Waiters recalled a mad axe.
    Fig. 99.     Adz with proper handle.
    Fig. 99b.     Old adz from Ashby farm.
    Fig. 100.     Pit sawing.
    Fig. 100b.   Why did they pit saw?
    Fig. 101.     Making full-dovetailed corners.
    Fig. 102.     Froe.
    Fig. 103.     Mallet.
    Fig. 104.     Shingle-making.
    Fig. 105.     Drawing of shingle-making.
    Fig. 106.     Drawknife.
    Fig. 107.     Strap and pintle hinges.
    Fig. 108.     Pintle.
    Fig. 109.     Hinge on Ms. Catherine’s door.
RUSKA GREGG—WOODCRAFTSMAN (Return to the top).
    Fig. 110.     Map: Where Ruska Gregg lived and worked.
    Fig. 111.     Bark spud.
    Fig. 112.     Gluts.
    Fig. 113.     Glut and basket.
    Fig. 114.     Waiters showing bottom of basket.
    Fig. 115.     Rim of the basket.
    Fig. 116.     Archie Waiters/Ruska Gregg Memorial Glut.
    Fig. 117.     Using Gregg's baskets in the 1930s.
    Fig. 118.     Trough.
    Fig. 119.     Rasp.
    Fig. 120.     Cant hook.
RECALLING OTHER CRAFTSMEN (Return to the top).
    Fig. 121     Wooden “hinge”
    Fig. 122.     Lock from gin house.
WORKING IN THE FIELDS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 123.     $4.40 for a week’s work.
    Fig. 124.     Ms. Tena made sixty cents.
    Fig. 125.     Hoe blade.
    Fig. 126.     Nigerian hoe.
    Fig. 127.     The Pinkney’s hoe.
    Fig. 128.     Singletree.
COTTON-PICKING TIME (Return to the top)
    Fig. 129.     Cotton-picking sack.
    Fig. 130.     Field scale.
    Fig. 131.     Numbers on field scale.
    Fig. 132.     The Lightning Calculator.
    Fig. 133.     Cotton grown by Otis Waiters.
    Fig. 134.     Gin house scale.
    Fig. 135.     Weight for gin house scale.
    Fig. 136.     Second weight for gin house scale.
THE RICE GROWERS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 137.     Rice growers in Africa.
    Fig. 138.     Her mother grew rice.
    Fig. 139.     A woman rice grower.
    Fig. 140.     Frances Johnson with sickle.
    Fig. 141.     Vico Johnson’s Sickle.
    Fig. 142.     How Vico Johnson flailed rice.
    Fig. 143.     Nigerian woman flailing rice.
    Fig. 144.     Nigerian poster.
    Fig. 145.     Mortar and pestle.
    Fig. 146.     Pestle.
    Fig. 147.     Learning African skills.
ACKNOWLEDGING AFRICAN CULTURE AND CONTRIBUTIONS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 148.     Knowledge of Africa.
NEARBY AFRICAN-AMERICAN SITES (Return to the top).
    Fig. 149.     African-American Cemetery.
    Fig. 150.     Poster showing Rosenwald schoolhouse.
    Fig. 151.     Furniture in Ms. Catherine’s house.
PROVENANCE OF ARTICLES.
BOOKS & FILES RELATED TO HEWN-TIMBER CABINS.
ADDENDUM.
ARTIFACTS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 151b.   Andirons.
    Fig. 152.     Maul.
    Fig. 153.     Strap hinge.
    Fig. 154.     White-oak basket.
    Fig. 155.     Ms. Pinkney’s house broom.
    Fig. 156.     Washstand.
    Fig. 157.     Whatnot.
FARM RECORD BOOKS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 158.     Walter Wallace’s farm record book.
    Fig. 159.     A page in Walter Wallace’s farm record book.
    Fig. 160.     Mars Bluff gin-house books.
    Fig. 161.     Very small spiral notebook.
    Fig. 162.     Captain McIntyre’s record book.
POSTERS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 163.     Poster: People with a sheet of cotton.
    Fig. 164.     Poster: A cotton sack and burlap sheets.
    Fig. 165.     Poster: Weighing-up time.
    Fig. 166.     Poster: Archie and Catherine Waiters.
    Fig. 167.     Poster: Archie Waiters holding picture.
    Fig. 168.     Poster: Alex Gregg and Florence Gregg.
    Fig. 169.     Poster: Three generations.
    Fig. 170.     Poster: 1929 payroll with Hun’s name.
    Fig. 171.     Poster: 1929 payroll with Ms. Tena’s name.
    Fig. 172.     Poster: Archie Waiters’s connection to the gin record.
    Fig. 173.     Poster: Using Ruska Gregg’s baskets.
    Fig. 174.     Poster: The old ways of housekeeping.
    Fig. 175.     Poster: Catherine Waiters sweeping yard.
    Fig. 176.     Poster: Cora Robinson and swept yard.
    Fig. 177.     Poster: Catherine Waiters with medicinal plants.
    Fig. 178.     Poster: Wallpaper from the hewn-timber house.
    Fig. 179.     Poster: Johnnie Waiters lived in the hewn-timber house.
    Fig. 180.     Poster: Where the old meets the new.
    Fig. 181.     Poster: African roots.
    Fig. 182.     Poster: Three cultures merged.
    Fig. 183.     Poster: Archie Waiters, 1914-1990.
    Fig. 184.     Poster: Fannie Jolly Ellison: a woman rice grower.
    Fig. 185.     Poster: How Frances Johnson’s father flailed rice.
    Fig. 186.     Poster: Nigerian woman flailing rice.
    Fig. 187.     Poster: Old Cemetary.
    Fig. 188.     Poster: Hewn-timber cabin after the hurricane.
    Fig. 189.     Poster: Hewing with a broadax.
    Fig. 190.     Poster: Hewing with an adz.
    Fig. 191.     Poster:  Cornering.
DATA FOR ACCESSION RECORDS (Return to the top).
    Fig. 192.     Pints of canned food.
    Fig. 193.     Quarts of canned food.
    Fig. 194.     Empty quart jars.
    Fig. 195.     Half-gallons of canned food.
    Fig. 196.     Plain straight chairs.
    Fig. 197.     Plain straight chairs, seats.
    Fig. 198.     Type of caning in armchair.
    Fig. 199.     Felling ax, modern.
    Fig. 200.     Poster: Johnnie Waiters was the last person.
LISTING OF ITEMS RELEVANT TO THE EXHIBIT BUT NOT YET DONATED`   

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Copyright Amelia Wallace Vernon. All rights reserved, 1998. Revised, 2011.